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Create a Bitbucket Server (build-via-API) Configuration

Updated

This page contains instructions for creating a Bitbucket Server configuration so that users will have the option to select Bitbucket Server as the source code repository host for new algorithms they create.

Note that there are two types of Bitbucket Server providers you can use. With the “build-via-API” provider type described on this page, a separate API call is required for triggering an actual algorithm build after the source code is pushed to the repository’s master branch. At the end of this page are example code and commands showing how to trigger a build.

See the Bitbucket Server (build-on-checkin) page for details on how to set up a configuration with the other provider type.

Table of Contents

Bitbucket Server setup

To create a Bitbucket Server SCM configuration on Algorithmia, you’ll first need to configure a project and SSH key on the Bitbucket Server side, as described in this section.

Prerequisites

  1. Bitbucket Server version >= 5.6 is required.
  2. Bitbucket Server must be set up with a valid SSL certificate.

Configuring server access

  1. Log in to Bitbucket Server as an administrator and open the admin panel by clicking the gear icon at the upper-right corner.
  2. Open the Server settings tab from the options at left.
  3. Enter the Base URL for the Bitbucket Server instance, including the https:// part in the string.
  4. Enable HTTPS and SSH access by checking the appropriate boxes as indicated in the screenshot below. We recommend configuring SSH on a different port than the web interface.

Configuring a project

To configure a project within your BitBucket Server instance, click Projects at the upper-left corner and then Create project at the upper-right corner of the Projects page. Enter a Project name and Project key and an optional Description, and click Create project. Note that the example code on this page uses ALGO_PROJECT as a placeholder for the project name and PRJ as a placeholder for theproject key, which must be exactly 3 uppercase alphanumeric characters.

Configuring SSH key authentication

In order to programmatically manage algorithm repositories on behalf of a user, you’ll need to create an SSH key pair. You’ll add the public key to Bitbucket Server and you’ll store the private key as JSON content in a file, which you’ll POST in algorithm build requests. SSH keys are used in algorithm creation; the SSH key configuration steps are addressed further down on this page.

A note about Bitbucket Server user accounts

In this flow, two different Bitbucket user roles are required. In the sample code on this page they’re represented as follows:

  • BB_PROJECT_OWNER_{USERNAME/PASSWORD} represents a Bitbucket user account that has the right to create new repositories in a specified Bitbucket project.
  • BB_REPO_USER_{USERNAME/PASSWORD} represents a Bitbucket user account that’s been granted read permissions to a target algorithm’s Bitbucket repository.
    • Note that Bitbucket supports configuring SSH keys directly on a repository as opposed to attaching them to a Bitbucket user. The repository-level SSH key model may also work, but it hasn’t yet been tested by Algorithmia.
    • Note also that at present, this solution is only verified to support SSH keys created in PKCS1 RSA PEM format.

Algorithmia setup

A note about authentication tokens

The Authorization header displayed in the sample code on this page is listed as Simple|Bearer to indicate that either an API key or a JSON Web Token (JWT) can be used as an authentication token. Switching between these two authentication modes simply involves switching the Authorization header between Simple type and Bearer type, and providing the corresponding authentication token. All other aspects of the REST calls shown here are unaffected by this header.

In this flow, two different Algorithmia user roles are required, and the authentication tokens are represented as follows:

  • CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN represents either an admin API key with Management Access turned on or a JWT of a user who has cluster admin access rights on the target Algorithmia cluster.
  • ORG_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN represents either a standard (non-admin) API key with Management Access turned on, generated by a user with admin rights to the org that owns a given algorithm, or a JWT of a user who has org admin access rights in the target org on the Algorithmia cluster.

For example, in the code below, for -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ **CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN**' you’d use one or the other of the following commands, replacing the placeholders as appropriate:

    • '-H Authorization: Simple **ADMIN_API_KEY**'
    • '-H Authorization: Bearer **JSON_WEB_TOKEN**'

Creating a Bitbucket Server SCM configuration

After deployment of a new Algorithmia cluster, a cluster admin must create a Bitbucket Server SCM configuration. This is a one-time setup step on each cluster.

Begin by adding the code below to a file add_bitbucket_scm.json, making sure to first:

  • Replace PRJ with the three-character project key you configured on the Bitbucket Server side.
  • Replace all occurrences of BB_SERVER_DOMAIN under urls with the URL specific to your Bitbucket Server instance.
  • Replace BB_CONFIGURED_SSH_PORT with the SSH port number that you’ve configured.

Note that "provider": "bitbucket" here refers to Bitbucket Server. (Algorithmia also has a Bitbucket Cloud configuration, which would be specifically denoted by "provider": "bitbucket**__cloud_**".) In the request, you’ll need to replace CLUSTER_DOMAIN with your Algorithmia cluster-specific domain, and **CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN** as described above.

Contents of add_bitbucket_scm.json

{
  "provider": "bitbucket",
  "scm": {
    "project_key": "PRJ"
  },
  "urls": {
    "web": "https://BB_SERVER_DOMAIN",
    "api": "https://BB_SERVER_DOMAIN",
    "ssh": "ssh://git@BB_SERVER_DOMAIN:BB_CONFIGURED_SSH_PORT"
  }
}

REST request

$ curl -X POST -k https://CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/admin/scms \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN' \
    -H 'Content-type: application/json' \
    -d @add_bitbucket_scm.json

REST response

{
  "default": false,
  "enabled": true,
  "id": "1234abcd-12ab-34cd-56ef-789012ghijab",
  "provider": "bitbucket",
  "scm": {
    "project_key": "PRJ"
  },
  "oauth": {
    "project_key": "PRJ"
  }
}

The id value in the response will be needed in subsequent API calls; it references as SCM_CONFIG_ID in the sample code below. Note that the oauth object is required on the database side but can be safely ignored.

Listing SCM configurations

You can use the command below to list SCM configurations on your cluster.

REST request

$ curl -X GET -k https://CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/scms \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN' \
    -H 'Content-type: application/json'

The example response object shown below shows that in addition to the default internal SCM configuration ("provider": "internal"), this specific cluster currently has both a GitHub configuration ("provider": "github") and a Bitbucket Server configuration ("provider": "bitbucket").

REST response

{
  "results": [
    {
      "default": true,
      "enabled": true,
      "id": "internal",
      "provider": "internal"
    },
    {
      "default": false,
      "enabled": true,
      "id": "5678efgh-12ab-34cd-56ef-789012ghijab",
      "provider": "github",
      "scm": {
        "client_id": "OTHER_PROJECT_KEY"
      },
      "oauth": {
        "client_id": "OTHER_PROJECT_KEY"
      },
      "urls": {
        "web": "http://github.com",
        "api": "http://api.github.com",
        "ssh": "ssh://git@github.com"
      }
    },
    {
      "default": false,
      "enabled": true,
      "id": "1234abcd-12ab-34cd-56ef-789012ghijab",
      "provider": "bitbucket",
      "scm": {
        "client_id": "PRJ"
      },
      "oauth": {
        "client_id": "PRJ"
      },
      "urls": {
        "web": "https://bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN",
        "api": "https://bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN",
        "ssh": "ssh://git@bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN:8000"
      }
    }
  ]
}

Updating SCM configurations

You can update an SCM configuration’s enabled status and its associated urls. Begin by adding the code below to a file patch_scm_config.json. In this file, make sure to:

  • Replace all occurrences of NEW_BB_SERVER_DOMAIN under urls with the updated URL specific to your Bitbucket Server instance.
  • Replace BB_CONFIGURED_SSH_PORT with the SSH port number that you’ve configured.

Note that:

  • You can update the enabled status, the urls object, or both at the same time.
  • The enabled field can only be set to false if the SCM configuration is NOT the default.
  • The urls field must contain valid values for all three nested fields.

Contents of patch_scm_config.json

{
  "enabled": true,
  "urls": {
    "web": "https://NEW_BB_SERVER_DOMAIN",
    "api": "https://NEW_BB_SERVER_DOMAIN",
    "ssh": "ssh://git@NEW_BB_SERVER_DOMAIN:BB_CONFIGURED_SSH_PORT"
  }
}

In the following command, make sure to:

REST request

$ curl -X PATCH https://CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/admin/scms/SCM_CONFIG_ID \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN' \
    -H 'Content-type: application/json' \
    -d @patch_scm_config.json

Deleting SCM configurations

You can delete an SCM configuration that you no longer want on your cluster. In order for the deletion to be successful, the SCM configuration must first be disabled so that users can’t choose it as the source code repository host for new algorithms. See Updating SCM configurations for instructions on how disable an SCM. If you get a 4040 Unable to delete SCM configuration error, the SCM configuration probably hasn’t been properly disabled.

In the following command, make sure to:

REST request

$ curl -X DELETE https://CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/admin/scms/SCM_CONFIG_ID \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ CLUSTER_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN' \
    -H 'Content-type: application/json'

Creating Bitbucket Server-backed algorithms via API (version 1 method)

To create an algorithm through the API, begin by adding your algorithm metadata to a file create_algo_on_bitbucket.json. In this file, make sure to:

  • Replace both instances of ALGO_NAME with the name of your algorithm.
  • Replace ENV_ID with the id of an environment on your cluster; this will be a UUID like d1ec135c-4a4d-4e83-9a82-38f5699b4522. For details on how to get this id value, see the docs for listing available languages and environments. Note that the target value here is the id, not the environment_specification_id that you’d use for downloading the algorithm template itself.
  • Replace the SCM_CONFIG_ID value under scm with the id value of an existing SCM configuration, which you can retrieve by listing SCM configurations.
  • Replace the BB_PROJECT_OWNER_USERNAME/BB_PROJECT_OWNER_PASSWORD values under scmsCredentials with the username and password from the Bitbucket Server account used to set up the Bitbucket Server project.

Contents of create_algo_on_bitbucket.json

{
  "name": "ALGO_NAME",
  "details": {
    "summary": "Summary of what your algorithm does.",
    "label": "ALGO_NAME",
    "tagline": "Tag line for your algorithm."
  },
  "settings": {
    "source_visibility": "open",
    "username": "ALGO_OWNER",
    "algorithm_environment": "ENV_ID",
    "license": "apl",
    "network_access": "isolated",
    "pipeline_enabled": true
  },
  "source": {
    "scm": "SCM_CONFIG_ID",
    "initial_commit_message":"your commit message"
  },
  "scmsCredentials": {
    "username": "BB_PROJECT_OWNER_USERNAME",
    "password": "BB_PROJECT_OWNER_PASSWORD"
  }
}

REST request

$ curl -X POST -k https://CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/algorithms/ALGO_OWNER \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ ORG_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN \
    -H 'Content-type: application/json' \
    -d @create_algo_on_bitbucket.json

REST response

{
  "id": "d1ec135c-4a4d-4e83-9a82-38f5699b4522",
  "name": "ALGO_NAME",
  "details": {
    "summary": "Summary of what your algorithm does.",
    "label": "ALGO_NAME",
    "tagline": "Tag line for your algorithm."
  },
  "settings": {
    "algorithm_callability": "private",
    "source_visibility": "open",
    "language": "python3-1",
    "environment": "cpu",
    "license": "apl",
    "network_access": "isolated",
    "pipeline_enabled": true,
    "insights_enabled": false,
    "algorithm_environment": "61c5a799-f7d6-4a79-bed9-5acd37463e34"
  },
  "source": {
    "scm": {
      "default": false,
      "enabled": true,
      "id": "1234abcd-12ab-34cd-56ef-789012ghijab",
      "provider": "bitbucket",
      "scm": {
        "client_id": "PRJ"
      },
      "oauth": {
        "client_id": "ALGO_PROJECT"
      },
      "urls": {
        "web": "https://bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN",
        "api": "https://bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN",
        "ssh": "ssh://git@bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN:7999"
      }
    },
    "repository_owner": "ALGO_PROJECT",
    "repository_name": "ALGO_NAME",
    "repository_https_url": "https://bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN/ALGO_PROJECT/ALGO_NAME",
    "repository_ssh_url": "ssh://git@bb.CLUSTER_DOMAIN:8000:ALGO_PROJECT/ALGO_NAME.git" },
  },
  "resource_type": "algorithm"
}

The response object will contain an id value for the newly created algorithm. In subsequent calls to trigger a build of this existing algorithm, this value references as ALGO_ID.

After a successful API request to create the algorithm, a new repository will be created in Bitbucket with the template file content for the selected algorithm environment. The following steps should be taken directly in Bitbucket for a newly created repository:

  1. Configure a Bitbucket user (BB_REPO_USER_USERNAME) with write permissions to the repository, ensuring that the user has an SSH key associated with it in Bitbucket. Alternatively, you may try configuring an SSH key on the new repository itself; this repository-level SSH key model may work, but it hasn’t yet been tested by Algorithmia. For details on how to create an SSH key, see below.
  2. Commit the algorithm source files into the Bitbucket repository for the algorithm.
  3. Identify the commit hash in Bitbucket that represents the commit to use in the API request to trigger an algorithm build (shown below). This references below as BB_COMMIT_HASH and will be a value like 6375552a3dcc208f7483f4f58f123dab0dd9c546.

How to create an SSH key

Bitbucket v5.6.x supports two key types—DSA and RSA2—and the key you generate should be in PEM format. Note that OpenSSH keys are not supported. In order to generate an RSA 2048-bit key on MacOS, run the following command:

$ ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 2048 -m PEM -f bb55-key

Enter, and re-enter, a passphrase when prompted, or leave it empty. The public key will be stored in the bb55-key.pub file, while the private key will be stored in the bb55-key file.

Copy the public key to the clipboard (pbcopy < bb55-key.pub) and assign it to a user account or repository (on the Repository settings page under the Access keys tab).

Convert the private key to single-line format and copy it to the clipboard as shown below. The value for the private SSH key references as SSH_KEY_VALUE in the code below.

awk 'NF {sub(/\r/, ""); printf "%s\\n",$0;}' bb55-key | pbcopy

Triggering builds for Bitbucket Server-backed algorithms

In this API-only Bitbucket integration pattern, once you’ve created an algorithm and optionally pushed new commits to the repository, you’ll need to manually trigger an algorithm build by calling the algorithm’s /compile endpoint. This call can be initiated by an Algorithmia user account that’s an org admin for the specific algorithm.

Note that in the REST request in Option A, below, the algorithm UUID (ALGO_ID) value is the id value in the response from the create algorithm API call. It can also be looked up using the following route:

$ curl https://api.CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/algorithms/ALGO_OWNER/ALGO_NAME \
    -H 'Authorization: _Simple|Bearer_ ORG_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN'

In a file build_trigger.json, formatted as shown below, paste your SSH key (SSH_KEY_VALUE) and the commit SHA (BB_COMMIT_HASH, see above) for the target algorithm. Note that the SSH key should be in single-line format as shown in the commands above. Once this file is ready, use either option A or option B to build the algorithm. On success, an empty response body will be returned with a 202 status code to indicate that the request has been accepted for processing.

Contents of build_trigger.json 

{
  "sshPrivateKey": "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\nSSH_KEY_VALUE\n-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\n",
  "commitSha": "BB_COMMIT_HASH"
}

REST request (option A: using algorithm UUID)

$ curl -X POST -k https://api.CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/algorithms/ALGO_ID/compile \
    -H 'Authorization: Simple|Bearer ORG_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN'
    -H 'Content-type: application/json' \
    -d @build_trigger.json

REST request (option B: using algorithm owner and name in place of algorithm UUID)

$ curl -X POST -k https://api.CLUSTER_DOMAIN/v1/algorithms/ALGO_OWNER/ALGO_NAME/compile \
    -H 'Authorization: Simple|Bearer ORG_ADMIN_AUTH_TOKEN'
    -H 'Content-type: application/json' \
    -d @build_trigger.json